OMEGA GLOBEMASTER – THE WORLD’S FIRST MASTER CHRONOMETER

1. HISTORY

MORE THAN 50 YEARS OF INSPIRATION

Created in the true spirit of OMEGA, the Globemaster houses the brand’s most advanced mechanical movement and features a design inspired by early Constellation models that represent horological expertise and OMEGA’s legacy of precision and outstanding performance. Each watch is certified through a series of independent tests – a revolutionary process that establishes a new quality standard in the watch industry.


OMEGA’s history influenced the Globemaster’s caseback, where a medallion has been stamped with an image of an observatory, representing the precision awards that the watchmaker received during the famous chronometer observatory trials.


Eight stars in the sky above the observatory symbolize the most important precision records that OMEGA set and, reflecting how the brand’s commitment to quality has endured, the stars also signify the eight METAS-certified criteria that a timepiece and its movement must pass in order to receive Master Chronometer status.


Two design features that define the Globemaster are also its dial, which is created in a style that watches collectors have long referred to as a pie-pan dial, and the “fluted” bezel, an element that has decorated several famous Constellation watches.




CO_Globemaster_Ambiance_13053392102001 - Omega - Lugaro - Vancouver & Victoria


2. TECHNOLOGY


MASTER CHRONOMETER

In December of 2014, OMEGA held a press conference together with the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology (METAS) to announce a new watch certification process that would become active in 2015. The Globemaster is the first watch to be tested and approved according to this new process, which, in addition to measuring the performance of the watch in daily wearing conditions, ensures that it functions properly when exposed to strong magnetic fields up to 15,000 gausses. Any watch brand can submit its watches for these METAS-approved tests in order to receive Master Chronometer standing, a label that at once makes a statement about the quality of not only the mechanical movement but also of the watch itself.
Before the watch is exposed to the magnetic field and its performance is measured according to the criteria approved by METAS, the movement must pass the tests established by the Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres (COSC). Along with their watch, customers will receive a certification card that includes an identification number which they can use to see how their watches performed on each test. This documentation is proof that the watch has been certified by METAS. Watches that pass the tests receive Master Chronometer standing. The eight criteria that are measured during the certification process are:

 

  1. AVERAGE DAILY PRECISION OF THE WATCH

This test runs over four days and checks the daily precision of the watch in real life wearing conditions.  The watch is initially placed in six different positions and two alternating temperatures, then exposed to the magnetism of 15,000 gausses, then demagnetized, then finally checked again in the same differing positions and temperatures. For each step, a photograph is taken of the watch and checked 24 hours later for accuracy against UTC time.

 

  1. FUNCTION OF COSC-APPROVED MOVEMENT DURING EXPOSURE TO 15,000 GAUSS MAGNETIC FIELD

This test examines the movement of the watch only, placing it in two different positions, and subjecting it to a magnetic force of 15,000 gausses. During a time of 30 seconds in each position, the functioning of the movement is audibly checked using a microphone.

 

  1. FUNCTION OF WATCH DURING EXPOSURE TO 15,000 GAUSS MAGNETIC FIELD

This test is similar to the second. On this occasion, instead of just the movement being tested, the entire watch is subjected to magnetic fields of 15,000 gausses, with the functioning being checked by way of audio. In today’s modern world, magnetism is all around us, in places such as tablets, phones, hairdryers and even the metallic clasps of women’s handbags. Mechanical watches without anti-magnetic innovation can suffer long-term effects in their accuracy when exposed to these magnetic fields.

 

  1. DEVIATION OF DAILY PRECISION AFTER EXPOSURE TO 15,000 GAUSS MAGNETIC FIELD

This test works out the average deviation of the watch between day 2 and 3 of the first test. The result shows the daily precision of the watch before and after exposure to a magnetic field of 15,000 gausses.

 

  1. WATER RESISTANCE

This test submerges the watch underwater, gradually applying more pressure up the point of the stated water resistance. For certain watches, it also goes beyond. This ensures that each watch is properly tested for underwater conditions.

 

  1. POWER RESERVE

This test checks the power reserve of the watch by taking pictures at the beginning and end of the expected limit. Checking any deviation again, this proves that each watch functions accurately for its stated time. For wearers, it’s valuable to know that, even after a weekend on the bedside table, your watch will still be performing well.

 

  1. DEVIATION OF RATE BETWEEN 100% AND 33% OF POWER RESERVE

This test puts the watch in six different positions, similar to each side of a dice. With the watch at full power, the watch spends 30 seconds in each position, with average precision recorded by way of audio. The power reserve is then reduced by two-thirds and checked again, to ensure that precision is kept even when the watch is not at full power.

 

  1. DEVIATION OF RATE IN SIX POSITIONS

This test is similar to the previous test, and checks for any deviation in the running time when the watch is placed in six different positions, similar again to each side of a dice. With 30 seconds in each position, the results are recorded through audio. By placing a watch in different positions, we can ensure a watch’s performance no matter what the wearer is doing, whether it’s sitting at a desk or actively playing a sport.

 

3. GLOBEMASTER COLLECTION


CLASSIC DESIGN MEETS TECHNOLOGY OF THE FUTURE

Available in a wide range of materials including 18K Sedna™ gold, 18K yellow gold and stainless steel, the Globemaster will forever be recognized as the first Master Chronometer.


The 39 mm timepiece features the iconic pie-pan dial made famous by the Constellation models in 1952. The central hour, minute and seconds hands match the indexes, all of which are coated in Super-LumiNova – as are the hour and minute hands. There is also a date indication at 6 o’clock on the dial.


Surrounding the dial is a fluted bezel whose top ridges are smoothed, giving the Globemaster a unique look that ensures it will remain immediately identifiable for generations to come. The bezel on the stainless steel models is made of a hard metal (tungsten carbide).